Yoga Anatomy Newsletters

Yoga, Poses, Stylized, clip

Yoga thought for the day: “There is never any reason to rush or force oneself into a yoga pose.” – Ray Long, MD FRCSC and Chris Macivor, 3d Graphic Designer/Illustrator, The Daily Bandha: Scientific Keys to Unlock the Practice of Yoga

“You can’t integrate the pieces until you can differentiate them, and that for most people is a big deal – most people don’t even register on a sensory level that there’s a distinction between their shoulder blades and their upper back.” – Leslie Kaminoff, internationally acclaimed yoga instructor and author

Yoga should never hurt. Now that I am a yoga instructor, one of my principal concerns is ensuring students’ safety. I encourage them to learn to listen to and honor their bodies. This takes practice. I want to help each student find the best expression of the pose for her or his body. I try not to overwhelm students with verbal cues regarding alignment and anatomy, but I do want continually to improve my own knowledge about these crucial subjects to better serve my students.

Two online resources I have found especially useful and interesting for understanding what’s going on anatomically in yoga poses are Ray Long and Chris Macivor’s email newsletter, which you can sign up for at http://www.dailybandha.com/ and Leslie Kaminoff’s weekly email newsletter, which you can sign up for at http://yogaanatomy.net/.  If you are not already familiar with the work of these experts, you may want to check them out. 

Yoga remains ever fresh and exciting for me because it is a never-ending adventure in learning – about myself, others, and the marvelous universe we inhabit. Needless to say, cooking and baking also provide endless opportunities for discovery. And now with summer vegetables at their peak, it’s time to explore and enjoy your creativity in the kitchen.

Philip and I are fortunate to have a friend, Mark, who has an extraordinary organic garden. Recently, Philip returned from a visit to Mark with several bags full of gorgeous melons and vegetables. I took the time to take photos of these wondrous gifts before they went under the knife, but was not so good about taking the time to take photos of the finished dishes. We were just too eager to eat!

Nevertheless, I would like to share this recipe for an incredibly good curry I made just one week ago that featured Japanese eggplant and fresh basil from Mark’s organic garden, along with brocoli, cauliflower, and mushrooms from my neighborhood farm stand, which features mostly organic or pesticide-free local produce.

Eggplant Curry

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • vegetable broth, about one cup
  • 1 Japanese eggplant, cut into cubes
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh broccoli florets
  • 1 1/2 cups fesh cauliflower florets
  • 4 ounces mushrooms, halved or quartered, depending on their size
  • 1/2 cup red lentils, rinsed and drained
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil

For the sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons red curry paste
  • 1 tablespoonlow sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon agave nectar
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup light coconut milk

Instructions: Heat the olive oil in a dutch oven over medium heat. Add the eggplant and 2 tablespoons vegetable broth and sauté, stirring contantly for 2 minutes. Add additional vegetable broth by the tablespoon as necessary to keep the eggplant from sticking to the bottom of the dutch oven. Add the broccoli and cauliflower and 2 more tablespoons vegetable broth. Sauté, stirring constantly, 2 more minutes. Add the mushrooms and 2 more tablespoons vegetable broth. Stir to combine well. Lower heat and cook, stirring frequently, until mushrooms release their juices.  Meanwhile, prepare the sauce. Combine the red curry paste, soy sauce, and agave nectar and then whisk in the vegetable broth. Add sauce to vegetables. Add the lentils. Stir to combine well. Add the coconut milk. Let come to a boil, stirring frequently. Lower heat to a simmer, cover and cook 20 to 30 minutes, untl lentils and eggplant are soft. Check frequently and add water, if necessary, in small amounts, to prevent the vegetables from sticking to the bottom of the dutch oven and to provide enough liquid for the lentils to cook properly. But don’t over do it, because you want the curry to be thick and creamy. Stir in the basil before serving. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste. I like to serve this over a blend of couscous and brown rice, or couscous, brown rice and quinoa.

Note: The yoga image used in this post is in the public domain.